FAQ

This FAQ is related to questions around TorBox. If you have questions about Tor or the Tor Browser, see here.

Table of contents
1. Should I change the default passwords? How can I change my passwords?
2. Should I change the name of the wireless network (SSID) of my TorBox ^? How can I change it?
3. Can I hide the name of the wireless network (SSID) of my TorBox?
4. Which SSH client do you prefer?
5. Do you know some useful browser add-ons to improve anonymity, security and/or usability?
6. Do you know some important configuration adjustments for Firefox (via about:config) to
    improve anonymity and security?
7. I’m connected to TorBox and all is working as expected, but I’m not able to download
    something with my BitTorrent client. What’s wrong?
8. Isn’t there a workaround so that I can use TorBox and BitTorrent the same time?
9. I’m connected to TorBox and all is working as expected, but Firefox, Safari and any iOS device
    don’t display .onion sites. What’s wrong?
10. For starters, do you know some interesting .onion sites?
11. How can I be sure, if my device is using the Tor network?
12. Why do I receive a yellow onion on the Tor Project’s check-site?
13. My client, which is connected to the TorBox, doesn’t receive any IP address.
14. My TorBox doesn’t receive any IP adress from the networks router.
15. Wicd (the network manager) tries to connect a wireless network, but it stucks with “Validating
    authentication”, the programm crashes and/or seems to have a lot of bugs. What’s wrong?

• • •

The advanced menu in TorBox v.0.22.
The advanced menu in TorBox v.0.22.
Question:
Should I change the default passwords? How can I change my passwords?
Answer:
You should change the default passwords a soon as possible. This is an easy task: login into your TorBox with an SSH client, go to the advanced menu (menu entry 10) and choose the according menu entries (see the image on the right side).

Question:
Should I change the name of the wireless network (SSID) of my TorBox? How can I change it?
Answer:
This is not mandatory, but you can do it without considerable effort: login into your TorBox with an SSH client, go to the advanced menu (menu entry 10) and choose the according menu entry.

Question:
Can I hide the name of the wireless network (SSID) of my TorBox?
Answer:
Yes, and it is easy to accomplish: login into your TorBox with an SSH client, go to the advanced menu (menu entry 10) and choose the according menu entry.

Question:
Which SSH client do you prefer?
Answer:
There is a extensive collection of SSH clients. Usually it doesn’t matter which one you are using. These are my personal recommendation:

For a list of other SSH clients, see here.

An iPad connected to TorBox running arm (Tor statistics) in a vSSH terminal.
An iPad connected to TorBox running arm (Tor statistics) in a vSSH terminal.

 
Question:
Do you know some useful browser add-ons to improve anonymity, security and/or usability?
Answer:
Yes, but first let me repeat one important point: if your well-being depends from your anonymity, then is highly recommended to use the Tor Browser only or even better Tails (read here, here and here why).
In my opinion following browser add-ons are very useful:

  • https-everywhere: Automatically makes websites use a more secure HTTPS connection instead of HTTP, if they support it. With HTTPS, even the connection between the Tor exit node and the web server is encrypted. (ESSENTIAL for SECURITY / ANONYMITY; available for Firefox, Firefox for Android, Chrome and Opera).
  • CanvasBlocker: Allows users to prevent websites from using the Javascript canvas API to fingerprint them. (ESSENTIAL for ANONYMITY; available for Firefox)
  • Privacy Pass: Allow users to redeem validly signed tokens instead of completing captcha solutions. Clients receive 30 signed tokens for each captcha that is initially solved. Privacy Pass is currently supported by Cloudflare. (ESSENTIAL for USEABILITY; available for Firefox and Chrome).
  • uBlock Origin: The only real working and independent ad blocker. (ESSENTIAL for USABILITY; available for Firefox, Chrome and Opera).
  • uMatrix: Point and click matrix to filter net requests according to source, destination and type. (ESSENTIAL for USABILITY; available Firefox and Chrome).
  • Privacy Badger: A balanced approach to internet privacy between consumers and content providers by blocking advertisements and tracking cookies that do not respect the Do Not Track setting in a user’s web browser (available for Firefox, Chrome and Opera).
  • FoxyProxy: FoxyProxy is an advanced proxy management tool (available for Firefox, Chrome, Safari and Opera).

Do you have another very useful browser add-on? Let me know in the comment section below!

Question:
Do you know some important configuration adjustments for Firefox (via about:config) to improve anonymity and security?
Answer:
Yes, but first let me repeat one important point: if your well-being depends from your anonymity, then is highly recommended to use the Tor Browser only or even better Tails (read here, here and here why).
In my opinion following configuration adjustments for Firefox are very useful:

  • To disable WebRTC (possible IP leak!!), search for media.peerconnection.enabled and double-click on it –> false.
  • To disable face detection using cameras, search for camera.control.face_detection.enabled and double-click on it –> false.
  • To disable geolocation services, search for geo.enabled and double-click on it –> false.
  • To disable the ability to report what plugins are installed, search plugin.scan.plid.all and double-click on it –> false.
  • To disable web speech recognition through the microphone, search media.webspeech.synth.enable and media.webspeech.recognition.enable and double-click on them –> false.
  • To disable all telemetry features, search for “telemetry” and disable all true/false settings related to telemetry by setting them to false.
  • To harden your browser (a little bit) against fingerprinting, search for “privacy.resistFingerprinting” and double-click on them –> true.
  • To enable tracking protection, search for “privacy.trackingprotection.enabled” and double-click on them –> true.

For more information see here or here. Do you have other important configuration adjustments for Firefox or any other browser? Let me know in the comment section below!

Question:
I’m connected to TorBox and all is working as expected, but I’m not able to download something with my BitTorrent client. What’s wrong?
Answer:
BitTorrent will not work over Tor, because Tor doesn’t support UDP. There are clients with a “Tor-switch” and there are people using the Socks5 feature of the Tor Browser. But this doesn’t change the fact that UDP will not be routed through Tor. If in these configurations BitTorrent works properly, this means that the UDP packages goes clear-net, revealing the identity of the client. With TorBox client-devices don’t have direct access to the clear-net. Consequently, UDP packages will be dropped and the identity of the client will be safeguarded. By the way: due to the high bandwidth usage caused by the BitTorrent protocol, it is considered impolite and inappropriate by Tor community members to use the Tor network for BitTorrent transfers. For that reason, some Tor exit nodes block BitTorrent traffic.

Question:
Isn’t there a workaround so that I can use TorBox and BitTorrent the same time?
Answer:
Yes there is, but it is a little bit complicated and slow. You need Socks5 proxy server and a BitTorrent client, which works properly with it (for example Deluge and Vuze). BitTorrent is now tunneled through Tor to the proxy server. Regarding the Socks5 proxy server: we didn’t found any reliable working free public proxy server. The best server we found is coming with costs, even not so much: Private Internet Access (for alternativ commercial proxy providers see here). Nevertheless, you should think very carefully about the necessity to use Tor for your BitTorrent traffic, because it is slow and due the high bandwidth the Tor community doesn’t like it.

BitTorent tunneled through Tor with a proxy server from “Private Internet Access”. It works, but it is terrible slow. It is probably useful to circumvent censorship but not for daily use. After the screenshot, I cancelled the download, no bytes were harmed.

 
Question:
I’m connected to TorBox and all is working as expected, but Firefox, Safari and any iOS device don’t display .onion sites. What’s wrong?
Answer:
As per IETF RFC 7686, “Applications that do not implement the Tor protocol should generate an error upon the use of .onion and should not perform a DNS lookup.” Currently it still works with Google Chrome, but not with Firefox or Safari. To display an .onion site, you have to use the Tor Browser or the Onion Browser on iOS.

Question:
For starters, do you know some interesting .onion sites?
Answer:
Of course, here is a very short collection: Ahmia Search Engine, Deep dot Web News, OnionDir – Deep Web Link Directory, Deep Web Search Engine, Duck Duck Go Search Engine, Facebook, Imperial Library, The Hidden Wiki, The Pirate Bay, The Tor Project Homepage, TorLinks.

For more sites, see also here (on “clear-web”): Deep Weblinks, here or here (in German).

All works just fine....
All works just fine….
Question:
How can I be sure, if my device is using the Tor network?
Answer:
Go to https://check.torproject.org/. For more information, you can also use the check site operated by JonDonym. Check with Panopticlick (by the EFF), if your browser is safe against tracking? To check for other browser leaks, go here (an excellent analytic tool!); additionally, you could also test against IP leaks and DNS Nameserver spoofability. You can also monitor your data transfer by using the menu entry 2 on your TorBox main menu. On OS X, there is a nice program, which permanently displays the IP address of your Tor exit node in the menu bar.

Question:
Why do I receive a yellow onion on the Tor Project’s check-site?
Answer:
Because the user agent string of your web browser differs from the one from the Tor Browser. The Tor Browser is using following user agent string: “Mozilla/5.0 (Windows NT 6.1; rv:52.0) Gecko/20100101 Firefox/52.0”. You can easily switch your current user agent string with “User Agent Switcher” (for Firefox). But there are side effects:

  1. Changing the user agent without changing to a corresponding platform will make your browser nearly unique and allow to fingerprint your device.
  2. If your string is saying that you are running Windows NT 6.1, most likely a download page will automatically offer you a download package for Windows NT, even if you are running OS X. Therefor, a user agent switcher allows you to change the string in one or two clicks, if needed.

Question:
My client, which is connected to the TorBox, doesn’t receive any IP address.
Answer:
Usually the DHCP-server on TorBox will provide your client with all necessary information. If it doesn’t work, and you are sure that you client is configure accordingly, first try to restart TorBox. Shouldn’t that doesn’t work either, then try to configure your client manually:

IPv4-Adress of your device: 192.168.42.x  (x > 12)
Net Masq: 255.255.255.0
Router / Gateway: 192.168.42.1
DNS: 192.168.42.1 / torbox.ch

 
Question:
My TorBox doesn’t receive any IP adress from the networks router.
Answer:
TorBox is configured as an DHCP client, which means that the router have to give TorBox all necessary network information (usually the router is configured like that). If that doesn’t work, try to configure TorBox manually according the data of your provider or an actual client, which works with your router properly:

sudo iptables <interface> <statische_IP_adresse>
sudo route add default gw <gateway_ip>

This TorBox (Raspberry Pi 2 Model B) with a TFT display, two wireless network adapter and a RS Pro PB-10400 Power Bank, 5V / 10,4Ah as a power source is connected to a wireless network in a Starbucks Coffee shop.
This TorBox (Raspberry Pi 2 Model B) with a TFT display, two wireless network adapter and a RS Pro PB-10400 Power Bank, 5V / 10,4Ah as a power source is connected to a wireless network in a Starbucks Coffee shop.
 
Question:
Wicd (the network manager) tries to connect a wireless network, but it stucks with “Validating authentication”, the programm crashes and/or seems to have a lot of bugs. What’s wrong?
Answer:
It is crucial that your Raspberry Pi does receive enough power (the red LED must not blink!!). If your Raspberry Pi doesn’t get enough power — for example if it is connected with an USB port of your Laptop — wicd tends to malfunction. In this case, try to unplugg all other USB devices, use a power adapter or put a battery pack between the power source and your Raspberry Pi (something like the RS Pro PB-10400 Power Bank, 5V / 10,4Ah).

One thought on “FAQ”

  1. Hi there !
    I was doing some research on Torrent, when I found your page here: torbox.ch/?page_id=112
    Did you know that Torrent isn’t illegal everywhere? I was quite surprised to read about it the other day. I torrent books and copyright-less content, and I think it’s unfair to be at risk when torrenting “legal” stuff. Anyway, the article below enlightened me and I hope it can be of use for your users too, if you decide to share it with them.
    Here it is:
    https://www.vpnmentor.com/blog/torrents-illegal-update-country/
    Let me know what you think about it!
    Best,
    Jane

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